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Autumn chill? Add a little spice!

spicy herbal tea

Autumn seems to have started early for me! I’ve been cold and craving spicy teas like this awesome Herbal Chai for a couple of weeks already!

Ingredients:
1 part Star Anise
1 part Ginger (1 part if dried, 2 parts if fresh)
1 part Cardamom (whole pods or crushed)
1 part Cinnamon
1 part Black Pepper
1 part Licorice root

Directions:
To prepare this tea combine herbs with water in a medium saucepan. Use 1 Tbs. tea for every cup of water. With the lid on, heat the water and herbs gently until steam or small bubbles begin to emerge, do not let it boil. Continue to let it steam/ simmer for 20 minutes. At this point you can strain the tea and enjoy or continue to let it steep with the lid on until you are ready to drink it.

(recipe by Brittany Wood Nickerson, Thyme Herbal)

 

Another favorite is Té de Canela (or cinnamon stick tea, which I learned from Jessica Morgan, Morgan Botanicals). So simple, but soooo delicious!

Ingredients:
4 cups water
3 – 4 cinnamon sticks

Directions:
In a medium saucepan, heat the water and cinnamon sticks over medium-low heat, until the water turns a golden amber color. Sweeten if desired. (I like this one nice and strong, so simmer for about 1 hour, then leave on stove to steep all afternoon as I sip it, as Brittany does above).

 

Mmmmm…. I’m feeling warmer already…. 🙂

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Is it Garden or Micro-Farm?

Rescued this old post from my original (now completely lost) blog. I was glad to find it, so thought I’d repost it even though the timing is off- it was written in the Springtime 🙂

Here’s my husband Hawkeye just before he heads to the Co-op with a fresh harvest of Welsh Onions. This is our second “cash crop” this year, the first being pussy willow stems sold to a local florist earlier this spring.

Seems that it’s taken me awhile to realize what everyone else already knew: My herban garden has become a micro-farm.

Hawkeye always kept a vegetable garden and did canning. But for me, the garden was a hobby until I became interested in herbs. Then it became a passion. I started digging up ever-larger patches of lawn to make room for my ever-expanding collection of herbs.

I got hooked on herbal oils and salve-making, then started making all kinds of bodycare and perfumes. My stuff was so much better than anything I had experienced before (if I do say so myself)! The textures rich and luxurious; the aromas fuller, more complex and satisfying somehow.

Friends encouraged me to try selling my handcrafts at local craft fairs and farmer’s markets, and my business, Paradise City Herbal, was born.

So I’ve been growing herbs to use in my products for several years now. But it wasn’t until Richard, a micro-farmer I met on Twitter, remarked that I’m underestimating our efforts by calling it a garden, that I suddenly saw my backyard for the farm it is.

We’re growing so much food this year, and more herbs than ever before. We’ll have lots to eat, share, and preserve. Guess I’ll have to get me some Wellies and make it official!

Originally 05.15.2010
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Seeds of Hope

bean seeds

This is a difficult story of rape survivors in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The current statistic is every hour in the day 48 women are raped. So in addition to the horrible death toll of war, thousands of woman and children are left injured, abandoned, despised by their families and society, and with no hope for a future.

But one woman named Masika, herself a rape survivor, is helping other women recover and rebuild their lives by learning to grow their own food. Bean and corn seeds, farmed communally with other women, are not only feeding their hunger but acting as balm for deep psychological wounds.

I cried throughout the 25 minutes of this show. The suffering is overwhelming. The message, though, sings in my heart. Seeds and working the land are our way back to hope, back to life.

Not to discount the superhuman efforts Masika makes in caring for everyone, acting as counselor and mother. It is a heavy burden on her. She persists, she says, because there is no one else to do it.

But the seeds are the tool she’s using to achieve this miracle of saving and protecting life. Having come to gardening myself as a means to reconnect with the natural world and live a healthier, more meaningful life, it’s a message I already understood intellectually. After seeing Masika’s story though, I feel this deep truth has penetrated my inner-most core and lodged in my soul.

Watch the show here

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Do you Drink or Wear your tea?

Holy Basil (aka Tulsi)

I’ve been growing Holy Basil in the garden for three years and only fall deeper in love with each passing season! When you meet this plant, you understand instantly why it is so revered; its fragrance is truly heavenly! Being so useful medicinally while being so pleasant to consume really does seem a kind of miracle…..

Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum) is also commonly called Tulsi (which is Sanskrit for “the incomparable one”) and is worshipped by Hindus throughout India. In Ayurveda, it’s used as herbal tea, dried powder, fresh leaf, or mixed with ghee for the common cold, headaches, stomach disorders, inflammation, heart disease, poisoning, and malaria.

Essential oil can be extracted from Holy Basil and is used in skin care and herbal cosmetics for its anti-biotic, disinfectant, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties.

 

D.I.Y.

If your skin is acne-prone like mine, you’ll love what Holy Basil can do for you! Make a tea with dried Holy Basil and use it like a toner. It helps clear up acne and blemishes, while making your complexion appear brighter.

You can also use the tea as a hair rinse to add luster to dry hair and soothe an itchy scalp, as well as for a breath-freshening mouth rinse.

I like to add Holy Basil to bathtub tea too. Talk about a reviving, skin-soothing soak!

 

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Early Autumn Garden News

sunflower
Autumn Equinox, September 23rd

“It is a sad moment when the first phlox appears. It is the amber light indicating the end of the great burst of early summer and suggesting that we must now start looking forward to autumn. Not that I have any objection to autumn as a season, full of its own beauty; but I just cannot bear to see another summer go, and I recoil from what the first hint of autumn means.”   ~ Vita Sackville-West

 

The biggest news is Hurricane Irene. Unlike so many around us, we had very little damage from the storm. A couple of tomato vines and one sunflower were broken, and a tree limb fell on the mushroom shadehouse, snapping its wooden frame.

Hawkeye repaired the frame, I trimmed the vines and gathered the green tomatoes that had fallen to the ground, and aside from looking a bit windblown, the garden was back to normal….

 

Catch up with the rest of the garden happenings while grabbing some D.I.Y. recipes in the Early Autumn Newsletter- Just posted!

http://www.paradisecityherbal.com/Seasonal_Newsletter.html

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