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Lookin’ this good, everybody gonna swoon

Spring Lettuce in the garden

It’s actually almost embarrassing how in love with Lettuce I am…. 

One of the first things I can eat out of my garden in the Spring, Lettuce’s amazing variety of colors, textures, and flavors is enough to put me into a swoon.

And more than just a pretty face, Lettuce is rich in vitamin A and potassium plus has some vitamin C, calcium, iron, and copper.

(*except Iceberg Lettuce, which is very low in nutritional value)

 

Lettuce fits into my small-space garden rule which requires plants to do double-duty: Besides eating it, you can wear it 😉

A lettuce face mask helps restore skin’s natural pH, soothes rough skin, and can help heal pimples.

 

Put lettuce in a blender to pulp, then massage onto skin. For a fancier version, add a little olive oil and lemon juice. Olive oil is a great moisturizer, and lemon juice a gentle astringent that cleans and refines pores.

 

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Chamomile in the Springtime Garden

chamomile

German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) is one of the first signs of green in my Springtime garden, and a very welcome sight it is!

A member of the Daisy Family, Chamomile contains calcium, potassium, vitamin B2, flavonoids, coumarins, and salicylates. The flowers are used for their antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, sedative, and vulnerary properties.

The flavor is described as both sweet and bitter. You’ll notice its appley aroma which is just how it tastes, but if you make the same mistake I did and steep your tea extra long (medicine-making style), it becomes really bitter!

Chamomile is used in skin care to soften dry skin, clean pores, clear acne, and reduce puffiness. It’s also a key herb to use for healing wounds and inflammations such as burns, itches, and bug bites.

Try using Chamomile in a steam to ease nasal congestion. Used as a bath herb, Chamomile can relieve stress and calm cranky children.

I also like to use Chamomile to make a massage oil that soothes sore muscles and aids relaxation. This oil is wonderful on sore, swollen feet!

 

* If you are sensitive to Ragweed you may be allergic to Chamomile. Be careful when you first try it. Otherwise, it’s considered very safe.

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Infotainment for herbanites

Paradise City Micro-Farm YouTube Channel

When the weather outside is frightful and all you feel like doing is curling up around the warm glow of your computer screen….

Here’s my take on “the best of the best” gardening and herbal videos on YouTube. Check out my Playlists for

  • Natural Skin Care
  • Herbal Profiles
  • How-to’s and Recipes

plus Favorites like “Why Permaculture Folks Love Comfrey” and “Amazing Urban Permaculture Food Forest Garden” at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoBAaly1FHPtXhBX4HgU7qw.

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Oil Cleansing Method

I admit it. I’m a butterfly. I jump from soap to scrub to cream to toner to clean my face– depending on my mood, the weather, and how much time I have.

But I’ve been noticing the texture and tone of my skin isn’t as nice as I’d like, not to mention the new wrinkle that’s appeared under each eye.

So I’m testing the power of a “routine”, and knowing that discipline is not my strong suit, trying to make it as easy as possible.

The Oil Cleansing Method uses just one product, takes only a few minutes, plus feels really good!

I’m doing it morning and night. I don’t need to use moisturizer afterwards, though I am still using my eye creme at night 😉

 

New to the Oil Cleansing Method? Crunchy Betty explains what it is and how it works, and compares different oils to use for different skin types. (*One point I disagree with. Crunchy Betty says it can be more expensive, but I think it’s the opposite!)

The blend I’m using is super-simple: half castor oil, half calendula-infused olive oil. I’ll report back in a couple weeks to let you know how it’s going!

 

For more information and to see how the Oil Cleansing Method is done, watch this video from Hey Fran Hey.

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