Posted on

Win some, Lose some: Farm update

different varieties of eggplant

The farmers are hot, sweaty, and tired. A local weatherman confirmed this today, saying we haven’t had a day under 80ºF since July 8.

To my memory, most days have been over 85ºF with really high humidity. And the rain- so much rain! It’s great to not have to use irrigation but we’ve had way too much rain. Good news for the city reservoirs. Bad news for our plants.

We lost the crookneck squash and many zucchini, all the basil, a bunch of rosemaries, and the sweet peppers are struggling.

Fortunately, everybody else seems to be hanging in there. We’ve got lots of beans, patty pan squash, kale, callaloo, hot peppers, and gorgeous eggplants!

The only damage in the herb garden is from downpours that bent and broke plants, including my calendulas which are hardly budding and putting out flowers. On the plus side, we’ve harvested more mint this year than ever before. They are fat and happy.

More rain is in the forecast for the next several days. We’re trying to take it in stride but are a bit worried about losing more crops which means losing income. If you see Hawkeye, give him a thumbs-up and any positive words you can. He could use it.

Posted on

Summer Balms On Sale

elderflower skin balm

Time to clear out the Summertime Balms to make way for the coming Wintertime blends. Elderflower, Chickweed, and Red Clover skin balms are on sale now.

These all natural herbal balms are handmade at the farm and contain certified organic Mango Butter, certified organic Virgin Coconut Oil, Watermelon Seed Oil, and Candellila Wax. They’re concentrated, super moisturizing, and perfect for soothing little nicks and scrapes.

Packaged in a non-breakable, recyclable tin that was manufactured in the U.S.

Normally $26.00 each, available now for $20.00 (1.75 oz (50 g) net wt.)

Sale ends September 30, 2018. Check them out in the shop.

Share
Posted on

Summer Goodness Skin Balm

flower and root vegan skin balm

 

Announcing a new skin balm, made with all the goodness of Summer! I’m calling it “Flower & Root”.

Roses and Carrots, plus Calendula, Elderflower, and Marshmallow in a blend of Watermelon seed oil, Virgin Coconut oil, and Mango butter.

Scented with Geranium, Frankincense, Lime, Lavender, and Amyris essential oils. Been working on this blend for awhile, and it came out really nice. I’m excited!

 

Deeply moisturizes dry skin. Gentle, creamy, and soothing. Also useful for everyday nicks and scrapes.

On sale now in our online store }

Share
Posted on

It’s getting embarrassing…

fresh-cut Tulips from my garden
fresh-cut Tulips from my garden

Several people have asked me recently, “Are you still making your herbal products?”. It’s kindof getting embarrassing because I am making things all the time but no one seems to know…

My fault, of course! I’m not good with keeping up my newsletter and blog posts.

It’s a busy time for us on the farm right now as well, getting all the seeds started and plants into the ground.

But I do have skin balms available here in the online shop. Made with Watermelon Seed oil, Mango Butter, and Virgin Coconut oil, they are a richly moisturizing, dry skin treat. Perfect for the rough skin of gardening hands 🙂

Salves and soaps will be coming back soon.

 

Share
Posted on

It’s Winter Solstice- Celebrate with Sage

winter solstice sun on snow-covered conifer

Winter Solstice, the longest night of the year and the beginning of Winter. We toast days past and make plans for the year to come…

One herb I associate with Winter is Sage. It’s in lots of recipes for cold weather foods, and drinking and gargling with the tea is an old remedy for cold weather coughs and sore throats.

Probably another reason I think of Sage as a Winter herb- Sage is practically evergreen in my garden. The leaves get small and curl in the frigid temperatures but they and their stalks keep standing, even in the snow. It reminds me the garden is still there, though out of sight asleep below the ground.

But many old herbalists thought of Sage as an herb of Spring. They taught that the leaves are at their best before the flower stalks rise, so late Spring was the proper time to eat lots of Sage and drink Sage tea if you wanted to ensure good health.

Sage was considered a magical plant too, said to give protection and grant wishes. From my perspective, all plants are pretty magical. They have abilities that are so beyond me (for instance, being able to regrow their whole body when cut down to the root)! Sage does feel special, though; the textured, almost-sticky leaves with their unique gray-green color, the beautiful aroma left on your hands after touching them. Even the feeling you get when you’re hanging out with Sage. It’s so peaceful.

So tonight, as Hawkeye and I celebrate the Solstice, I’ll have a big pot of water with some dried Sage simmering on the stove. We’ll make our Solstice wish and breathe in the soft green scent of the promise of next year’s garden.

 

Share