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First Herb Harvest

fresh-cut chives, catnip and thyme

I might deny I said this come the rose blossom days of sun-filled June, but I love Spring the best.

(Wait, I already have to take it back. The rushing in of summertime in the weeks around Summer Solstice is what I really love. Spring is just thrilling in a different way.)

The garden is jumping up fast and we we were able to start cutting some herbs today. Chives are always the first to fully grow out, but our well-loved Sorrel isn’t far behind. We hope to be cutting Sorrel and Garlic Chives next week, so wish us some rain 🙂

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Happy Spring!

garden tools and flowers

We’re celebrating the first day of Spring by starting our planting today. (Indoors only! There’s still snow on the ground.)

Kale is first on the list, and in a first a for us, Lemongrass.

Every year I swear off tender plants that have to be overwintered in the house, but I’m making another exception for Lemongrass.

We fell in love with Lemongrass when we saw it growing wild on the island of Dominica. It was everywhere! Blew our minds to see it growing like, you know, grass on the side of the road, instead of the hothouse plant we know it as.

And if you know Hawkeye, you know Dominica has become the place that’s first in his heart. He can’t wait to get back there. Until then, we’ll keep practicing a stuffed breadfruit recipe, drinking rum with lime juice, and catching some sights of the West Indies on these fun sailing channels on YouTube:

Wishing you Caribbean sunshine and a very Happy Spring!

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Can’t find Spring? Make it yourself

forsythia flowers

If you have access to a forsythia bush, you can make your own Spring a little ahead of the calendar.

Forsythia flowers will bloom early if you cut some stems and bring them inside. They’ve lasted over a week on my kitchen table and have been such a treat to have as we’ve just gotten another foot of snow!

It’s really easy- Here’s how:

Cut forsythia stems on a mild day when the temperature is above freezing and put them in a bucket of warm water.

Once inside, cut another inch off the bottoms of the submerged stems. This second cut, performed underwater where air cannot get in, will promote water uptake.

Keep them in a bright spot and you’ll start to see flowers in about 6 days.

Happy Early Spring!

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Signs of Spring

spinach and chickweed

We have a big patch of green in the middle of the foot of snow in the backyard- a bumper crop of chickweed growing in our cold frame with the spinach I planted last Fall.

Hawkeye still kindof thinks of chickweed as a nuisance, but for me, it’s a favorite!

One of the first plants to appear in Spring, you can eat it like spinach and it’s a very helpful medicinal. Awesome in bodycare too, I love using soothing chickweed in oils and salves for irritated skin.

Learn more about chickweed the way I first did, from herbalist Susun Weed: “Chickweed Is A Star

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Spring Comes to the Micro-Farm

We’ve been having unusually cold weather and still have snow on the ground, so it doesn’t quite feel like Spring even though today is the Equinox.

Last year at this time I was already planting radishes but this year…. well…. I don’t think I’ll be planting outside anytime soon!

Inside the (unheated) hoophouse though, we have Spinach ready to harvest with Lettuce, Kale, and Mâche not far behind.

spinach
spinach

And the cold-season greens are not the only ones who’ve been enjoying the advantages of the new hoophouse.

Me, the Rosemary, and the English Thyme could not have gotten through this long, cold Winter without it 🙂

hoophouse
Sheri in the hoophouse