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Everything balm for everybody

calendula balm pictured with calendula flowers

Been working on new labels and new photos for our farm-made skin balms.

Hope I’m heading in the right direction with “everything” balms. Just seems like if you have to buy one product for your face, another for your cuticles, another for your feet (etc,), the only one getting real benefit is the manufacturer.

I like keeping things simple, and would rather have one product I can use for everything. So I’ve designed these balms to soothe and protect *all* your skin—face, hands, cuticles, elbows, knees, legs, and feet.

And coming soon is a new blend that will be aroma-free, containing no essential oils. Then we’ll have an everything balm for everybody.

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There she goes (reformulating) again

botanical skincare

Maybe I make it harder than it has to be. But, you know, I want my skincare creations to be perfect and for me that means ingredients that are organic, fair trade, and from as close to home as possible.

Which means I have to say goodbye to Watermelon seed oil. I’m hooked on this oil! It’s light, it’s nutritious, so beautiful and so good for skin. Unfortunately, I can’t find it organic.

So I’m reformulating my balm recipes and bringing in organic Safflower oil and organic virgin Sunflower oil, two lovely oils I’ve worked with before but kindof forgot as I got caught up with the more exotic options.

The balm herbal blends I have now (Tulsi, Calendula, and Echinacea will stay the same, with a new one (Yarrow) being introduced for Holiday season later this year.

Perfection might be a lofty goal, but I have a reason: I never want you to have to worry when you put something I’ve made on your skin.

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Bee Balm harvest, Happy farmer!

sheri the herbal mixtress

A life-changing event happened for me a few weeks ago. Herbalist Tony(a) Lemos (director of Blazing Star Herbal School) saw my photo of a Bee Balm plant I’d identified as having powdery mildew and told me I was mistaken. It wasn’t the disease powdery mildew but part of the natural leaf pattern and perfectly fine to use.

It took me a little while to process this. Actually, my brain is still turning it over. For years I’ve been rushing to get what Bee Balm I could harvested before what I called “the funk” (whitish spotting) appeared on the leaves. Then, I’d chop the plant down.

bee balm leaf

To think I’ve been wasting so much of one of my favorite plants for so long makes me actually pretty distraught. I am so grateful that Tony(a) gave me a shout!

So this year I waited and watched. The splotches have mostly faded away, just a bit left on one plant, and there’s been a big spurt of growth. It’s only a small exaggeration to say they had become little shrubs, full of bunches of new leaves with a couple flowers here and there.

I’ve never seen Bee Balm grow so big in my garden- though I have seen them that big when growing wild- and I guess now I know why. You don’t have to cut them down mid-season! (argh… )

Their exuberance crowded and shaded the Peppermint and Chives growing in the same bed allowing me the excuse/opportunity for another harvest. Just leaves. I left the flowers for the bees.

bee balm harvest

I’ve never had so much Bee Balm in my stash. Can’t decide what I want to make first!

 

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Win some, Lose some: Farm update

different varieties of eggplant

The farmers are hot, sweaty, and tired. A local weatherman confirmed this today, saying we haven’t had a day under 80ºF since July 8.

To my memory, most days have been over 85ºF with really high humidity. And the rain- so much rain! It’s great to not have to use irrigation but we’ve had way too much rain. Good news for the city reservoirs. Bad news for our plants.

We lost the crookneck squash and many zucchini, all the basil, a bunch of rosemaries, and the sweet peppers are struggling.

Fortunately, everybody else seems to be hanging in there. We’ve got lots of beans, patty pan squash, kale, callaloo, hot peppers, and gorgeous eggplants!

The only damage in the herb garden is from downpours that bent and broke plants, including my calendulas which are hardly budding and putting out flowers. On the plus side, we’ve harvested more mint this year than ever before. They are fat and happy.

More rain is in the forecast for the next several days. We’re trying to take it in stride but are a bit worried about losing more crops which means losing income. If you see Hawkeye, give him a thumbs-up and any positive words you can. He could use it.

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Summer Balms On Sale

elderflower skin balm

Time to clear out the Summertime Balms to make way for the coming Wintertime blends. Elderflower, Chickweed, and Red Clover skin balms are on sale now.

These all natural herbal balms are handmade at the farm and contain certified organic Mango Butter, certified organic Virgin Coconut Oil, Watermelon Seed Oil, and Candellila Wax. They’re concentrated, super moisturizing, and perfect for soothing little nicks and scrapes.

Packaged in a non-breakable, recyclable tin that was manufactured in the U.S.

Normally $26.00 each, available now for $20.00 (1.75 oz (50 g) net wt.)

Sale ends September 30, 2018. Check them out in the shop.

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